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Plane slides off runway at NYC's LaGuardia Airport

Passengers walk from a Delta jet which skidded off the runway at Laguardia airport is attended by emergency personnel in New York CityA jet carrying 125 passengers crashed into a fence while landing in snowstorm.



Matt Bai: Biden should run. Now

U.S. Vice President Joe Biden applauds children who gave him a karate demonstration as Villa Nueva's Mayor Edwin Escobar looks on in Villa Nueva on the outskirts of Guatemala City, Tuesday, March 3, 2015. Biden is on a two day trip to meet with Central American leaders regarding immigration issues. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)The handicapping crowd has never taken Joe Biden all that seriously as a foil to Hillary Clinton in a presidential run. But he’s a middle-class champion who makes the case for economic fairness with more conviction than Clinton and less vitriol than Elizabeth Warren. He’s a serious thinker on foreign policy who opposes rampant interventionism without sounding like a pacifist. He more than holds his own as a debater. And he has nothing to lose by making one last run before riding the Amtrak back to Delaware for good.



Live: Day 2 of the Boston Marathon bombing trial

Boston Marathon bombing survivors Heather Abbott, left, and Karen Rand, center, are escorted from federal court, Wednesday, March 4, 2015, in Boston, after the first day of the federal death penalty trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring 260 people. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)Yahoo! News is inside the courtroom as gruesome testimony unfolds.



Attack on US envoy part of S.Korea's violent protest history

A suspect, bottom, identified by police as a 55-year-old, surnamed Kim, is overwhelmed by participants at a lecture hall in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, March 5, 2015. U.S. Ambassador Mark Lippert was slashed on the face and wrist by a man wielding a blade and screaming that the rival Koreas should be unified, South Korean police said Thursday. (AP Photo/Yonhap, Kim Ju-Sung) KOREA OUTSEOUL, South Korea (AP) — A knife attack Thursday that injured the U.S. ambassador to South Korea is the latest act of political violence in a deeply divided country where some protesters portray their causes as matters of life and death.



Source: Obama counsel not aware of Clinton's email practice

FILE - In this Jan. 23, 2013 file photo, then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, on the deadly September attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, that killed Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans. Congressional aides say the special House committee investigating the 2012 attacks on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya, will issue subpoenas for Clinton's personal emails. The aides say that possible as early as Wednesday, the committee will seek the additional material from the potential 2016 Democratic presidential candidate. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House counsel's office was not aware at the time Hillary Rodham Clinton was secretary of state that she relied solely on personal email and only found out as part of the congressional investigation into the Benghazi attack, according to a person familiar with the matter.



Delta plane slides off runway at snowy New York airport

Plane slides off runway at LaGuardiaBy Laila Kearney NEW YORK (Reuters) - A Delta Air Lines jetliner landing during a snowstorm at New York's LaGuardia Airport on Thursday slid off the runway and struck a fence before coming to rest at the edge of Flushing Bay, but there were no serious injuries. All of the 127 passengers and five crew members aboard were evacuated safely from the aircraft on inflatable slides and moved to the airport terminal on buses, officials said. The incident occurred at about 11 a.m. EST (1600 GMT) as Delta flight 1086 was landing at LaGuardia after a morning flight from Atlanta.



Businesses back gay marriage, top U.S. court sets argument date

Supporters of same-sex marriage hold a rainbow flag and a rainbow umbrella outside Jefferson County Courthouse in BirminghamBy Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Big business rallied behind the gay marriage cause on Thursday as the U.S. Supreme Court scheduled oral arguments for April 28 on the contentious social issue that promises to yield one of the justices' most important rulings of 2015. A total of 379 businesses and groups representing employers across various sectors, including Google Inc , American Airlines Group Inc , Goldman Sachs Group Inc and Johnson & Johnson , have signed on to a friend-of-the-court brief in support of gay marriage due to be filed later on Thursday. The court must decide whether states have the right to ban gay marriage. There are currently 37 states where gay marriage has been allowed to proceed, although a legal battle is ongoing in Alabama, with the state's top court putting it on hold.



Senate Democrats step up pressure for vote on attorney general

Lynch testifies during her Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing to become U.S. attorney general on Capitol Hill in WashingtonBy Lindsay Dunsmuir WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Senate Democrats on Thursday wrote a formal letter to Republicans urging them to hold a vote to confirm Loretta Lynch as the next U.S. attorney general. There is still no date set by the Republican majority for a vote to be held on the Senate floor for Lynch's nomination, despite the Senate judiciary committee's endorsing her a week ago. The letter, circulated by Democratic Senators Chuck Schumer and Patrick Leahy, urged the Republicans to schedule a floor vote as soon as possible.



Embattled Hillary Clinton urges State Department to release emails

Former secretary of state Hillary Clinton delivers dinner remarks at EMILY's List 30th Anniversary GalaBy Steve Holland WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Democrat Hillary Clinton on Wednesday broke her silence over a budding controversy involving her use of personal email for work when she was secretary of state, saying she wanted the U.S. State Department to release them swiftly. Clinton's statement was aimed at cooling a political firestorm over allegations that she inappropriately used her personal email for work while secretary of state from 2009 to 2013. The State Department said it will review the emails provided by Clinton "using a normal process that guides such releases." "We will undertake this review as quickly as possible. Clinton's tweeted statement came hours after a congressional committee investigating the Sept. 11, 2012, attack on a U.S. diplomatic facility in Benghazi, Libya, issued subpoenas for her emails.



Ferguson probe reveals rampant police racism

Ferguson Report: Rampant Racism and Other Scathing Findings From ProbeU.S. Attorney General Eric Holder says report shows deep distrust and hostility in the community.



'It WAS him': Defense admits Tsarnaev bombed Boston Marathon

It this courtroom sketch, U.S. Attorney William Weinreb, left, is depicted delivering opening statements in front of U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., right rear, on the first day of the federal death penalty trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, Wednesday, March 4, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev, depicted seated second from right between defense attorneys Judy Clarke, third from right, and Miriam Conrad, right, is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring 260 people. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)BOSTON (AP) — The question, for all practical purposes, is no longer whether Dzhokhar Tsarnaev took part in the Boston Marathon bombing. It's whether he deserves to die for it.



Benghazi committee subpoenas Hillary Clinton's emails

FILE - In this Oct. 18, 2011, file photo, then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton checks her Blackberry from a desk inside a C-17 military plane upon her departure from Malta, in the Mediterranean Sea, bound for Tripoli, Libya. Clinton used a personal email account during her time as secretary of state, rather than a government-issued email address, potentially hampering efforts to archive official government documents required by law. Clinton's office said nothing was illegal or improper about her use of the non-government account and that she believed her business emails to State Department and other .gov accounts would be archived in accordance with government rules. (AP Photo/Kevin Lamarque, Pool, File)The House Select Committee on Benghazi is planning to subpoena Clintonmail.com.



In Israel, analysts see election boost for Netanyahu from speech

Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu waves following his address to a joint session of the US Congress on March 3, 2015, in Washington, DCMany analysts in Israel say Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's speech before Congress, which challenged President Obama's strategy on Iran, may help him garner votes in upcoming elections.



'It was him': Day 1 of the Boston Marathon bombing trial

In this Monday, Jan. 5, 2015 file courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, left, is depicted beside U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., right, as O'Toole addresses a pool of potential jurors in a jury assembly room at the federal courthouse, in Boston. Two highly anticipated criminal trials are underway almost simultaneously in Massachusetts: the federal death penalty trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and the murder trial of former New England Patriots star Aaron Hernandez. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins, File)Follow Yahoo News' live coverage from inside the courtroom.



US clears officer in Ferguson case, criticizes police force

In this Nov. 25, 2014 file photo, police officers watch protesters as smoke fills the streets in Ferguson, Mo. after a grand jury's decision in the fatal shooting of Michael Brown. A Justice Department investigation has found patterns of racial bias in the Ferguson police department and at the municipal jail and court. The full report, to be publicly released on March 4, says the investigation found Ferguson officers disproportionately used excessive force against blacks and too often charged them with petty offenses. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department on Wednesday cleared a white former Ferguson, Missouri, police officer in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black 18-year-old, but also issued a scathing report calling for sweeping changes in city law enforcement practices it called discriminatory and unconstitutional.



Justices sharply divided over health care law subsidies
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sharply divided along familiar lines, the Supreme Court took up a politically charged new challenge to President Barack Obama's health overhaul Wednesday in a dispute over the tax subsidies that make insurance affordable for millions of Americans.
McDonald's chicken gets new standard: No human antibiotics

An order of McDonald's Chicken McNuggets is displayed for a photo in Olmsted Falls, Ohio Wednesday, March 4, 2015. McDonald's says it plans to start using chicken raised without antibiotics important to human medicine and milk from cows that are not treated with the artificial growth hormone rbST.. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan)NEW YORK (AP) — McDonald's says it plans to require chicken suppliers to stop using antibiotics important to human medicine within two years.



U.S. Supreme Court split over Obamacare challenge

Supreme Court weighs new conservative attack on ObamacareBy Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court appeared sharply divided on ideological lines on Wednesday as it tackled a second major challenge to President Barack Obama's healthcare law, with Justice Anthony Kennedy emerging as a likely swing vote in a ruling. The nine justices heard 85 minutes of arguments in the case brought by conservative opponents of the law who contend its tax credits aimed at helping people afford medical insurance should not be available in most states. A ruling favoring the challengers could cripple the law dubbed Obamacare, the president's signature domestic policy achievement. Kennedy, a conservative who often casts the deciding vote in close cases, raised concerns to lawyers on both sides about the possible negative impact on states if the government loses the case, suggesting he could back the Obama administration.



Ferguson police review of Brown shooting remains a secret

US clears officer in Ferguson case, criticizes police forceSeven months after one of its white officers fatally shot an unarmed black 18-year-old, the Ferguson, Missouri, Police Department’s own findings of what transpired remain under wraps. Excessive force and possible civil rights violations by the suburban St. Louis department have been the focus of a Justice Department investigation since Darren Wilson shot Michael Brown Jr. multiple times last August.



Opening statements set for Boston bombing trial

In this Jan. 5, 2015, file courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, left, is depicted beside U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., right, as O'Toole addresses a pool of potential jurors in a jury assembly room at the federal courthouse, in Boston. Lawyers for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tsarnaev have asked a judge three times to move his trial out of Massachusetts because of the emotional impact of the deadly attack. Three times, the judge has refused. On Thursday, Feb. 19, Tsarnaev’s defense team will ask a federal appeals court to take the decision out of the hands of O’Toole Jr. and order him to move the trial. They insist that Tsarnaev cannot find a fair and impartial jury in Massachusetts because too many people believe he’s guilty and many have personal connections to the marathon or the bombings. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins, File)The case against Dzhokhar Tsarnaev begins today after nearly two months of jury selection.



Man killed by LAPD was wanted by U.S. marshals

This February 2000 photo provided by Ventura County Sheriff's Office shows Charley Saturmin Robinet after his arrest for robbery. Robinet was killed Sunday, March 1, 2015, after a confrontation with police. Authorities say he tried to grab a probationary officer's gun and three officers fatally shot him. The three officers who fired their weapons in a videotaped struggle that left a homeless man dead were veterans of the Skid Row beat who had special training to deal with mentally ill and other people in the downtrodden area, police leaders said. (AP Photo/Ventura County Sheriff’s Office)A homeless man shot by police was a convicted bank robber living under an assumed name.



Alabama Supreme Court halts gay-marriage licenses

U.S. Supreme Court Refuses to Halt Same-sex Marriages in AlabamaThe court orders the state's judges to stop issuing marriage licenses to gay couples.



Ferguson policies targeted blacks, created toxic environment: U.S. attorney general

St. Louis County Prosecutor's Office undated evidence photo shows Ferguson, Missouri police officer Darren WilsonBy Lisa Lambert and Carey Gillam WASHINGTON/KANSAS CITY, Mo. (Reuters) - A U.S. probe found systemic racial bias targeted blacks and created a "toxic environment" in Ferguson, Missouri, but cleared a white officer in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager there, Attorney General Eric Holder said on Wednesday. The report said the St. Louis suburb overwhelmingly arrested and issued traffic citations to blacks to boost city coffers through fines, used police as a collection agency and created a culture of distrust that exploded in August when Ferguson Officer Darren Wilson fatally shot 18-year-old Michael Brown. Brown's killing touched off a national debate on race, led to months of street protests and amplified long-standing complaints in Ferguson and across the country of police harassment and mistreatment of minorities. "But seen in this context, amid a highly toxic environment, defined by mistrust and resentment, stoked by years of bad feelings, and spurred by illegal and misguided practices, it is not difficult to imagine how a single tragic incident set off the city of Ferguson like a powder keg." Holder, who is stepping down soon as attorney general, called for wholesale and immediate change in the way Ferguson operates.



Netanyahu speech exposes bitter divisions

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks before a joint meeting of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 3, 2015. In a speech that stirred political intrigue in two countries, Netanyahu told Congress that negotiations underway between Iran and the U.S. would "all but guarantee" that Tehran will get nuclear weapons, a step that the world must avoid at all costs. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)Tthe optics of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s speech on Tuesday were just as important as the speech itself.



72 passengers reach settlements in Asiana crash

FILE - In this July 6, 2013, aerial file photo, the wreckage of Asiana Flight 214 lies on the ground after it crashed at the San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco. South Korean officials said Friday, Nov. 14, 2014, they will ban Asiana Airlines from flying to San Francisco for 45 days as punishment for a deadly crash in July last year. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, file)SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — More than 70 passengers aboard an Asiana Airlines flight that crashed in San Francisco two years ago have reached a settlement in their lawsuits against the airline, attorneys for the passengers and airline said in a court filing Tuesday.



GOP’s net neutrality point man says fight is not over

GOP’s net neutrality point man says fight is not overThe Republican Party’s point man in Congress on net neutrality admitted Tuesday that the GOP has been slow to act on the issue but insisted that Congress must be the body setting the rules for how the Internet will be regulated.



Ex-CIA chief admits sharing military secrets with mistress

FILE - In this June 23, 2011, file photo, CIA Director nominee Gen. David Petraeus testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, before the Senate Intelligence Committee during a hearing on his nomination. The Justice Department said Tuesday, March 3, 2015, that the former top Army general has agreed to plead guilty to mishandling classified materials. A statement from the agency says a plea agreement has been filed in U.S. District Court in Charlotte, N.C., the hometown of Paula Broadwell, the general’s biographer and former mistress. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Former CIA Director David Petraeus, whose career was destroyed by an affair with his biographer, has agreed to plead guilty to charges he gave her classified material — including information on war strategy and identities of covert operatives — while she was working on the book.



Thousands evacuated as Chile volcano erupts

The Villarica volcano erupts near Pucon, Chile, early Tuesday, March 3, 2015. The Villarica volcano erupted Tuesday around 3 a.m. local time (0600 GMT), according to the National Emergency Office, which issued a red alert and ordered evacuations. (AP Photo/ Lautaro Salinas) CHILE OUT - NO USAR EN PUBLICACIONES O WEBSITES EN CHILEFiery plumes of lava have forced thousands to flee.



UN moves to slap sanctions on South Sudan

South Sudan's President Salva Kiir (L) walks prior to a meeting on March 3, 2015 in Addis Ababa, as part of the latest round of peace talks to end over 14 months of conflictThe UN Security Council on Tuesday unanimously adopted a resolution to slap sanctions on South Sudan's warring factions, ratcheting up pressure as a deadline loomed to reach a peace deal. Drafted by the United States, the resolution sets up a sanctions committee which would submit to the council the names of those responsible for blocking peace efforts, and who should be punished with a global travel ban and assets freeze. Regional mediators have given South Sudan's President Salva Kiir and rebel chief Riek Machar until Thursday to reach a final deal to end 14 months of war that have killed tens of thousands of people.



Jailed Ukrainian pilot 'may be transferred to hospital'

Ukrainian helicopter pilot Nadia Savchenko featured on election posters ahead of last year's poll in October 2014A Ukrainian airforce pilot who has been on hunger strike in a Russian jail for 81 days might be transferred to a civilian hospital if her health deteriorates, the prison service said Tuesday. The statement by Russia's prison service raised the possibility of Nadia Savchenko, who is also a member of the Ukraine parliament, being transferred from the hospital of a Moscow prison where she has been held for nearly nine months. Speaking later in the day, one of her lawyers said she may stop the hunger strike if her health sharply worsens. She denies the charges, saying she was kidnapped and brought to Russia.



O'Malley rules out Senate as decision over White House bid looms
Former Maryland Governor and possible Democratic presidential candidate Martin O'Malley said on Tuesday he will not seek the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by retiring Senator Barbara Mikulski. O'Malley, who left office in January and has said he is considering a run for the White House, told reporters in an email he hoped other candidates would step up to represent the mid-Atlantic state, but "I will not be one of them." The move allows O'Malley, 52, to keep the door open for a potential presidential campaign. Despite winning two terms as governor in the heavily Democratic State, his future is somewhat complicated by his successor's surprise loss to a Republican in the November election. O'Malley is popular among Democrats and spent much of the last year actively campaigning for fellow liberals across the country, especially in New Hampshire and Iowa, the first two states with presidential nominating contests.
LAPD killing lays bare enduring horror of Skid Row

A pedestrian walks past flowers and candles placed on a sidewalk near where a man was shot and killed by police in the Skid Row section of downtown Los Angeles on Monday, March 2, 2015. Three Los Angeles police officers shot and killed the man as they wrestled with him on the ground, a confrontation captured on video that millions have viewed online. Authorities say the man was shot after grabbing for an officer's gun. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)A fatal police shooting raises broader questions about mass homelessness in L.A.



Netanyahu goes to Congress

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Jawad Zarif gesture as they arrive to resume nuclear negotiations in Montreuxthe Israeli PM will warn of the danger of trusting Iran curb its nuclear ambitions.



Democrats scramble to defend Hillary Clinton over email flap

Hillary ClintonBy Steve Holland and Amanda Becker WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Democrats scrambled on Tuesday to contain the fallout for Hillary Clinton, their favored 2016 presidential candidate, after allegations she inappropriately used her personal email for work while secretary of state. The Clinton camp quickly sought to discredit a New York Times report published late Monday that said her exclusive use of a personal email account from 2009 through 2013 and a lack of email preservation may have run afoul of the Federal Records Act. The report got wide play, largely because it fuels a political narrative from Republicans that Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, are obsessed with secrecy and seek to play by a different set of rules. Clinton spokesman Nick Merrill, however, said Clinton had followed both the "letter and spirit of the rules" while she was secretary of state.